Chopped Redheads

Careless layout results in chopped redheads

I have been studying and practicing photography for longer than I have been working on computers – about four decades at this writing. In all that time, I have learned that photographers should not awkwardly cut out body elements in pictures.

Recently I supported a coffee table book on Kickstarter for portraits of ladies with red hair1 . Redhead Beauty by Brian Dowling. I’m not concerned about the fact the book was received three months later than promised. I am not concerned about not getting the promised backer credit.

I am upset about the poor placement of the models within the frame. No – not artist license with framing the picture. The problem is the placement within the book.Chopped Redhead

Several photographs span two pages, with the model in the absolute center. Having the person’s head and torso on one page, with the legs on the other page is okay. Cutting their face in half is not good. The binding of the pages distorts the image. In the example to the right, the poor girl is missing a significant portion of her face.

Chopped RedheadShown left, the binding seam is near the edge of her face, but with the natural curve created by the binding, nearly half of her head is missing, as well as her fingers.

Other examples in this book slice through eyes and cheeks.

Besides the several images ruined by poor placement, this book is loaded with over one-hundred great images of beautiful red haired women from around the world – Ireland, Austria, Czechia, Italy, Hungary, Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, Poland, Slovakia, Russia, Ukraine, England, Scotland,Brazil, Canada, Australia and United States.

My simple advice to photographers – be mindful of the placement of portraits when you print books.

 

Footsies   [ + ]

1. . Redhead Beauty by Brian Dowling

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